• May Updates

    Our online safety PSA; presenting at a U.S. Health & Human Services and U.S. Department of Justice listening session; equipping children in Madagascar … and more.


    Read Post

  • Calm in the Chaos

    Earlier this year in the Philippines, we gathered the children in our Survivor Care and evacuated to remain safe from the eruption of a nearby volcano. Now, because of COVID-19, we’re sheltering in place in our safe homes. 2020 has been difficult because one of the most important things for children recovering from trauma is stability.


    Read Post

  • “Love146 will never abandon me.”
    An update on COVID-19

    As schools and many community activities close, many children will spend more time online. This is where most youth in our care met their traffickers. They may be more lonely, stressed, or even burdened by added financial strain their families will go through. Traffickers see opportunity here and certainly won’t stop working right now. We cannot stop working either.


    Read Post

  • October Updates

    Rob Morris on Prevention, U.S. Survivor Care eliminates its wait list; “Wynonna Earp” fans show us a little love, and more stories from the field.


    Read Post

  • April Updates

    What does it mean when we point out that a victim is “someone’s daughter”? — the latest news and insights from the field.


    Read Post

  • October Updates

    How do we measure success? — and other quick updates about how we’re continuing to fight child trafficking…


    Read Post

  • “Back to School” Means More for the Children In Our Survivor Care

    The education of youth is often interrupted by their exploitation. For children in our Survivor Care, re-engaging with school is like trying to climb a hill while carrying a heavy weight. The hill has typical steps and obstacles that everyone has to learn how to master. Like showing up on time. Like learning how to ask for your own makeup work. The kinds of things that every teenager has to learn how to do. Love146’s role is to make sure that the weight of exploitation and recovery doesn’t ultimately pull students backwards or prevent them from making that climb.


    Read Post

  • The Radical Kindness of “Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood”

    The documentary “Won’t You Be My Neighbor?” has appeared in the midst of a resurgence of interest in Mr. Rogers, fueled by a growing hunger for kindness in a world that has become increasingly angry and cynical. If you know anything about Mr. Rogers, you know his main theme was about the neighborhood — and about who the neighbor is. It’s a value that the children in our care remind us of on a regular basis.


    Read Post

  • A Day in the Life of a Love146 Social Worker – Part 1

    No time for breakfast. Meet a new youth coming into our care. Go over safety planning. On to next appointment. Grab a salad. Meet with another youth who was the victim of a traumatic assault. Try not to cry. Remind myself that with the right support we know they can have wonderful lives.


    Read Post

  • Seeing the full picture: The right training can change everything

    A recent report from from the UK has everyone talking. On the surface, the news is disheartening. The number of British national children referred through the National Referral Mechanism (NRM) has gone up by an astonishing 66 percent since 2016. In fact, the new numbers don’t point to an actual surge, but a noticeable change in practice of frontline staff who have received better NRM training and are now able to identify these children.


    Read Post

  • The Gift of Home

    In the UK more than a third of all trafficking victims are children. Many were brought here with false promises, threats, and abuse. Because it’s not an easily visible crime, it’s a bit hard to believe — that such a progressive and generous nation could still hold so many children in modern slavery. But it’s true. These young people are all around us: working in your local nail bar, at the carwash on the corner, as domestic servants, or forced to grow and sell drugs. The truth is, if they are invisible, it is because we have not taken the trouble to see them.


    Read Post

  • Beyond Resilience

    Resilience generally means the ability to bounce back or recover from trauma or difficulties. In the physical sense, resilience is the ability of a material to resume its shape, after being deformed. For the children in our care at the Love146 safe homes in the Philippines, resilience means more than that.


    Read Post

  • BREAKING NEWS

    Our US Survivor Care program has meant the world to children in Connecticut, children we know by name. Individual donors helped start this from scratch. That’s hope. Now, it will be expanding substantially, thanks in large part to contributions from fines and penalties paid by convicted federal offenders. That’s justice.


    Read Post